Compilation of stills, video, and time lapse photography of lightning and thunderstorms, shot between 2010 and 2012. 

Produced by Jason Weingart, with clip contributions by Jared Stevenson and Chris Racioppi. 

Music by Toscine - “Hell” (Creative Commons License)
All footage copyright Lightning Fast Media and may not be rebroadcast without consent.

rcruzniemiec:

Ormond Shelf by Jason Weingart
One of the five winners of NASA’s Extreme Weather Photo Contest. See the others here.

rcruzniemiec:

Ormond Shelf by Jason Weingart

One of the five winners of NASA’s Extreme Weather Photo Contest. See the others here.

(via rcruzniemiec-deactivated2013020)

discoverynews:

if i saw that cloud coming toward me i might seek shelter before snapping photos.

but perhaps that’s why i don’t win photo contests!

NASA’s Extreme Weather Photo Contest: Winners

Photo 1. This photo by Jason Weingart, a photography student at the University of Central Florida, shows a Volusia County lifeguard signaling to surfers at Ormond Beach, Fla., that it is time to exit the water.

Photo 2. Journalist Brian Allen with the Voice of America was at home in Arlington,  Va., when this storm rolled over Washington. “The storm that blew through started off with an incredible amount of lightning and then dumped a significant amount of rain in a short amount of time — on the other side of the river. DC got drenched and Arlington didn’t see a drop,” he reported.

see more photos…

2012 Chase Report 1

Date: 3/2/12

Location(s): Northwest Kentucky and Southwest Indiana

Storm Prediction Center Risk: High

Teams Involved: LightningFastMedia and Project: RECON

Synopsis: Two teams, five chasers, 2000 miles to travel. It was well worth it. LightningFastMedia and Project: RECON saw the first High Risk of the year coming from four days away. The teams agreed to rendezvous in Atlanta, Georgia and make the 300 mile trek to the Tennessee/Kentucky border. Their preliminary target of Clarksville, TN was just within the High Risk zone that the Storm Prediction Center had issued earlier that morning. After a filling breakfast and a gas up, the team started moving north into Kentucky. Jared Stevenson and his navigator, Harrison Levy, took the lead as they headed farther into the High Risk zone. By noon Central Standard Time, the team heard the words they had been looking for: Tornado Warning. Jason Weingart and his two fellow chasers, Stan Kruslicky and Stephan Saunders, soon took over as lead vehicle and the team sped north toward the Kentucky/Indiana border. Their target city: Evansville, Indiana.

Sometime between one and two PM CST, the teams heard of confirmed tornadoes and funnel clouds approaching Evansville. They stopped just north of the local airport in Evansville and saw several funnels and wall clouds that were quickly moving east. There may have been a funnel within the clouds, but the teams could not get a confirmed view of it. Without giving up hope, they got back in their vehicles and proceeded farther north, eventually stopping at North Evansville High School. As several lightning bolts struck close to the school, a wall cloud began to quickly drop from the supercell raging north of Evansville. The team called 911 to report the rotating wall cloud, but it did not spawn a tornado. The two groups started to speed south, attempting to get ahead a line of training supercell thunderstorms that were beginning to form along the western edge of the High Risk zone in Kentucky. 

As the afternoon progressed, the teams intercepted several more thunderstorms and were pummeled by nickel to quarter size hail, 60+ MPH winds, and very heavy rain. While the storms tried time and again to produce wall clouds and tornadoes, they were moving way too fast for the teams to chase them. Calling it a day, LFM and RECON headed back into Tennessee and chased the occasional severe thunderstorm and eventually split up in middle Tennessee.

Chase account by: Jared Stevenson

Photos and Video by: Jason Weingart, Stan Kruslicky

Produced by: Jason Weingart

2011 Severe Weather Highlight Video

(Source: LightningFastMedia..com)

Hard Freeze Warning in effect from 11pm tonight to 9am EST Wednesday. Bring in your pets and cover your plants!It is downright frigid, by Florida standards anyways, today here. Topped out at around 46F in Daytona Beach, expected to go below freezing for approximately 6 hours tonight. There’s going to be a lot of busy citrus growers.
Checking our extended forecast, there is no rain in sight, though we should warm back up into the 70’s on Friday. It’s now been 83 days since I shot my last thunderstorm, early in the morning of October 12, 2010; severe storm deprivation syndrome has really set in. Here’s to hoping the next one is a good one…and sometime soon.

Hard Freeze Warning in effect from 11pm tonight to 9am EST Wednesday. Bring in your pets and cover your plants!

It is downright frigid, by Florida standards anyways, today here. Topped out at around 46F in Daytona Beach, expected to go below freezing for approximately 6 hours tonight. There’s going to be a lot of busy citrus growers.

Checking our extended forecast, there is no rain in sight, though we should warm back up into the 70’s on Friday.

It’s now been 83 days since I shot my last thunderstorm, early in the morning of October 12, 2010; severe storm deprivation syndrome has really set in. Here’s to hoping the next one is a good one…and sometime soon.

First project for my illustrative photography class, topic is violence.

First project for my illustrative photography class, topic is violence.

Time-lapsed footage from some of the storms I have documented this year.

Been a rainy few days here in Volusia County, FL. Mostly just a big mess of rain, but this thunderstorm that rolled over Daytona today had some really nice structure.

Been a rainy few days here in Volusia County, FL. Mostly just a big mess of rain, but this thunderstorm that rolled over Daytona today had some really nice structure.

Footage and stills from along SR 40 as the storm that rolled through Northern Volusia County spun up. Was just about ready to call in a rotating wall cloud to the NWS when the feature quickly lost organization.